• Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 43 other followers

  • November 2017
    M T W T F S S
    « Mar    
     12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    27282930  

teaware curated by Etsy Mud Team on Etsy // Advertisements

From LaPella Pottery

Here is a Bamboo Brush Making tutorial originally posted on LaPella Art by Alex & Lisa of LaPella Pottery.

Repost on Japanese terminology

morgan pitelka • email • blog  asian studies • occidental college japanese ceramics terminology Below you will find rough definitions for a number of words commonly used in discussions of Japanese ceramics. I suggest using English equivalents whenever possible. If neccessary, give the Japanese term in italics with an English definition in parentheses. If you have suggestions, comments, … Continue reading

From fetishghost

very interesting post,follow the links down the rabbit hole Voulkos Pop-corn time! If you ever wished you could be a fly on the wall for a Peter Voulkos workshop… here it is. Voulkos is one of the more prominent peaks of American Ceramics during the past 50 years. A whole bunch of us have pivoted on … Continue reading

from StudioÉLAN

Snowflakes are Falling INSIDE!!! by Eleanor Hendriks Today’s blog is mostly pictures -of the process I use to make snowflake designs on my pottery. Blank slab formed plates   Cutting paper stencils Wait for it… …the fun part! Stockpile Matches made See you later! Wait… Careful! Ta Da!! Looking at the ruined stencils in the … Continue reading

From Lisa and Alex Lapella

Dropped Platters Last month, we saw this article in Ceramic Arts Daily about making pottery using dropped slabs. We had done this sort of thing on a smaller scale (with shorter drops), but we wanted to try it as an alternative to pressing slabs into slump molds. First, we created a variety of wooden frames. This … Continue reading

Japan

When meeting people on a hike I used to quickly judge them by the dirt on their clothes. Newbies always had dirt and grass on their knees ,muddy boots and an ill fitting backpack. Seasoned mountaineers  were always clean, quiet and had time to smile and say hello. I don’t know what to say about this … Continue reading

Recycling for potters